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Jacques Bourgault awarded the 2012 IPAC Vanier Medal


St John’s, August 20, 2012 – The Institute of Public Administration of Canada (IPAC) is proud to announce that Professor Jacques Bourgault, of Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM) and École nationale d'administration publique (ENAP), is the recipient of the 2012 IPAC Vanier Medal.

The Vanier Medal is IPAC’s highest form of recognition. It was created in 1962 in honour of Governor General Georges-P. Vanier, and is awarded annually to an individual who has shown distinctive leadership or made significant contributions in the field of public administration and the public service in Canada.

Jacques Bourgault has been an active and valued member of IPAC for over three decades. He has contributed numerous articles to academic and popular publications on topics ranging from Deputy Ministers and leadership, to public health policy. Professor Bourgault is the coeditor of the forthcoming (2013) Deputy Ministers in Canada: Comparative and Jurisdictional Perspectives (with Christopher Dunn), and Managing Publicly (2000, with Henry Mintzberg). He is a faculty member and advisor at UQAM/ENAP, and an esteemed contributor to the Canadian School of Public Service (CSPS). Professor Bourgault is also a leading member of the Quebec Bar, the International Political Science Association, and the International Institute of Administrative Sciences.

IPAC president Maria David-Evans said Professor Bourgault “personifies the salutary qualities that IPAC recognizes with this prestigious award. His mastery of all facets of Canadian public administration is remarkable. Jacques is truly a leader in the field due to the remarkable breadth and depth of his contributions.”

Mel Cappe, former Secretary to Cabinet and Clerk of the Privy Council, described Professor Bourgault as “a voice of reason with profound insights into the public interest and the public service”, whose contribution to the literature “has been instrumental in advancing our understanding of the machine of government.”

Founded in 1947, IPAC is a dynamic association of public servants, academics, and individuals dedicated to excellence in the field of public administration. It is a member based organization, with 18 regional groups across Canada, which creates effective knowledge networks and leading public administration research in Canada. IPAC is also a major player in exporting successful Canadian public sector expertise around the world.

David Dodge awarded the 2011 IPAC Vanier Medal 


Victoria, August 30, 2011 – The Institute of Public Administration of Canada (IPAC) has awarded Dr. David Dodge the Vanier Medal for his contributions to Canadian public service.

The Vanier Medal is IPAC`s highest form of recognition, created in 1962 in honour of the Right Honourable Georges-P. Vanier, Canada’s Governor General. The Medal is awarded to a person who has shown distinctive leadership and made significant contributions in public administration and to the public service in Canada.
The announcement took place at IPAC’s 63rd Annual Conference in Victoria, British Columbia on August 30. This conference brought together 500 delegates from all orders of government in Canada, academics, and guests from around the world.

The Vanier Selection Committee felt that there was no one more deserving of the 2011 Vanier Medal than David Dodge, who showed great leadership, skill, judgement and a very steady hand as Governor of the Bank of Canada from 2001-2008. He is also well known for safeguarding the fundamental tenets of the Canadian financial regulatory system and for speaking about the value of public service.

Dr. Dodge has led a very distinguished career as an academic and a public servant. He was educated in Economics at Queen`s and Princeton Universities. Dr. Dodge has taught at Queen's, Johns Hopkins and at the University of British Columbia. He was the Deputy Minister of Finance from 1992-1997, and served as Deputy Minister of Health from 1998-2001.

In 2008 Dr. Dodge was named Officer of the Order of Canada and elected in 2009 as a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, one of the highest honours for scholars in Canada.

Dr. Dodge is Chancellor of Queen’s University, and serves on several boards including the C.D. Howe Institute, the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Canadian Utilities and the Bank of Nova Scotia. Dr. Dodge is Senior Advisor at Bennett Jones LLP in Ottawa.

The Governor General Presents the IPAC Vanier Medal to Mr. Bryan P. Davies,
March 18, 2011

Bryan P. Davies Honoured with 2010 Vanier Medal

Press Release - Ottawa, March 18, 2011

Ottawa, March 18, 2011 - Bryan P. Davies is the 2010 recipient of the Institute of Public Administration of Canada’s Vanier Medal awarded today by His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston, Governor General of Canada, during a ceremony at Rideau Hall.

Mr. Davies’ acclamations attest to his achievements and success in public service. “Bryan is truly an effective leader with innovative skills that motivate colleagues and elicit the very best from the people he works with”, says Denise Amyot, IPAC President. Mr. Davies is a well-known senior leader in public administration and is the Chair of the Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation and Vice-Chair of the Canadian Securities Transition Office.

The Vanier Medal was created by IPAC in 1962 to honour the second Canadian Governor General, the Right Honourable Georges-P. Vanier. It is awarded annually as a mark of distinction and exceptional achievement to a person who has shown great leadership and has made a significant contribution in the field of public administration and public service in Canada.


     



The Institute of Public Administration of Canada is dedicated to excellence in public service and IPAC’s Vanier Medal is one of the highest forms of recognition for Canadian public administrators. IPAC’s CEO, Robert P. Taylor says “Bryan’s contributions to public service have touched many critical areas of public policy in Ontario and across Canada”.

The Honourable. Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance said “Bryan is a consensus builder and has excellent tactical vision. He has worked with governments of all political stripes, providing each his very best advice, always focused on ensuring that the public interest is paramount.”

“He is a personal architect who builds strong relationships and partnerships that have strengthened public administration in Canada,” according to Peter Barnes, former Secretary to Cabinet in Ontario.

Mr. Davies was appointed Chair of the Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation (CDIC) in 2006. He was Chief Executive Officer and Superintendent of the Financial Services Commission of Ontario from 2002 to 2005. Before then, he was Senior Vice President of Regulatory Affairs at the Royal Bank Financial Group. Mr. Davies has held senior positions in the Government of Ontario, including Deputy Treasurer and Deputy Minister of Economics. Mr. Davies also served as Vice President of Business Affairs and Chief Administrative Officer at the University of Toronto from 1992 to 1994.

Mr. Davies is a member of the Board of the General Insurance Statistical Agency, and is active with a number of non-profit organizations. Mr. Davies has also been a member of IPAC’s Endowment Fund Board for several years.
Mr. Davies holds a B. Comm. Degree from the University of Toronto and a Masters in Public Administration from Queen’s University.

Press Release - Ottawa, May 13, 2010
Dr. Gordon S. Smith Awarded 2009 Vanier Medal

Governor General Presented Vanier Medal to Dr. Gordon S. Smith

To read the Governor General’s speech, please click here.
To view photo gallery of the Vanier Medal presentation, click here.

Her Excellency the Right Honourable Michaëlle Jean, Governor General of Canada, presented today the 2009 Vanier Medal to Dr. Gordon S. Smith, Executive Director of the Centre for Global Studies at the University of Victoria, in British Columbia, and former distinguished Canadian public servant. The ceremony was held at Rideau Hall.

“Dr. Smith is well-known as both a practitioner and as an academic in public administration and has demonstrated excellence throughout his long career”, says Wynne Young, current IPAC President. “The Institute of Public Administration of Canada (IPAC) which is dedicated to excellence in public service is honoured to select the winner of this prestigious award each year. The Vanier Medal is one of the highest forms of recognition for Canadian public administrators.”

The Vanier Medal was created in 1962 in honour of Canada’s second Canadian Governor General, the Right Honourable Georges-P. Vanier, and is awarded annually by IPAC as a mark of distinction and exceptional achievement to a person who has shown distinctive leadership in public administration and public service in Canada, or who, by his/her writings, has made a significant contribution in the field of public administration or public service in Canada.

“Gordon Smith has dedicated his life to the service of his country. His distinguished achievements and superb leadership in each of his many roles over the past four decades have resulted from his sincere commitment to public service.” says Dr. David Turpin, President and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Victoria.

Dr. Smith’s involvement within the Government of Canada began with a focus on security and defence in the 1960s and he quickly advanced to increasingly complex and demanding positions, including Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs; Canadian Ambassador to the European Union; Ambassador to the Canadian Delegation to NATO; and Secretary to Cabinet for Federal-Provincial Relations.

“He was deeply respected by his international peers as someone to whom they could turn to help resolve pressing international issues. He was both a vital source of advice and a highly effective advocate for Canadian positions in all of NATO’s activities”, says Mr. Perrin Beatty of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, and played the principal role in drafting the major document setting out Canada’s defence policy in the 1970s. He served as a valued adviser on constitutional questions in the eighties.

After retiring from the Government of Canada, Gordon Smith continued serving the interests of Canada within an increasingly complex and interdependent world.

“As Executive Director of the Centre for Global Studies, Gordon Smith placed CFGS on the global map as a leading research centre respected by a wide range of individuals and institutions. The team, assembled under the umbrella of CFGS and leadership of Gordon Smith, has created an international network of experts on virtually all major global issues. He has also made effort to always set aside time to mentor students interested in public administration and public service, both as a Trudeau Mentor, and as a Faculty member of the University of Victoria and Royal Roads University” says John English, Professor and Executive Director of the Centre for International Governance Innovation.

Dr. Smith’s leadership of “L20”, a collaborative project between the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI) and the Centre for Global Studies at the University of Victoria was ground breaking and paved the way for the recent meeting of heads of government in Washington and the London meeting that focused on solutions to the financial crisis.

He was also Chair of the Board of Governors of the International Development Research Centre from 1997 to 2007 and was appointed to the International Advisory Board of Governors in 2006.

Press Release - Quebec City, August 29, 2008
Margaret Bloodworth receives highest honour

Margaret Bloodworth, National Security Advisor to the Prime Minister and Associate Secretary to the Cabinet, has received the Vanier Medal from the Institute of Public Administration of Canada (IPAC).

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“Margaret is the consummate professional. She has always put the public interest ahead of her personal goals and she has therefore been unafraid to speak truth to power and to take on the most difficult challenges” Ambassador Alex Himelfarb said.

Ms. Bloodworth’s skilled leadership and strong judgment throughout her lengthy career in the civil service have provided valuable guidance for government decision makers for nearly three decades. She has served in a wide variety of areas and in a number of high level positions in the public service, including as the Deputy Minister of Transport, Deputy Minister of National Defence, Deputy Minister of Public Safety and, most recently, as National Security Advisor to the Prime Minister, and associate Secretary to the Cabinet, Privy Council Office. Ms. Bloodworth is also one of the University of Winnipeg’s most distinguished and celebrated alumni.

The Vanier Medal is one of the highest forms of recognition for Canadian public administrators. It was created in 1962 in honour of Canada’s second Canadian Governor General, the Right Honourable Georges-P. Vanier, and is awarded annually by IPAC to recognize distinctive leadership and accomplishment.

She became full General Counsel of the Canadian Transport Commission in 1985. Four years later she joined the Privy Council Office as the Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet.
Within a span of only a few years, she became Deputy Clerk of the Privy Council (Security and Intelligence/Counsel) where she helped begin to guide the nation’s intelligence community toward its post-Cold War path. This was a role and direction that has marked her subsequent career.
In her capacity as Deputy Minister of Transport, she helped with coordination during and after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. Under her guidance key regulatory initiatives were realized; and she was an active participant on no less than seven Deputy Minister Committees at this same time.

Becoming Deputy Minister of National Defence in 2002, she guided significant progress on key defence and security policy files. She guided significant progress on key defence and security policy files. Management improvements in her department were also implemented at this time, including a balanced scorecard performance measurement tool, efforts toward human resources modernization, and reviewing departmental committees and governance structures. Under her leadership, the department began laying the groundwork for the defence policy review.

When the Department of Public Safety was created in 2003, Margaret Bloodworth was the obvious choice to be named its first Deputy Minister. She helped create the new department, leveraging the benefits of consolidating all the key security organizations under one portfolio, while ensuring their effective governance and interoperability.

She provided consistent and effective management in a complex environment throughout her tenure. Effective relationships with the provinces and the United States were pursued with respect to emergency management.

Bloodworth contributed to the development of Canada’s first National Security Policy. Margaret also helped develop a joint action plan with the former Deputy Secretary of the United States Department of Homeland Security, and a successful Cross Border Crime Forum was held.

Her department demonstrated its effective emergency response capacity during the terrorist bombings in London and with respect to Hurricane Katrina. The sustainability of this capacity was ensured in planning and responding to major domestic events in the future. A national Critical Infrastructure Protection Strategy was initiated.

Margaret Bloodworth was named Associate Secretary to the Cabinet in May 2006, marking her return to the Privy Council Office. She immediately made a real impact, concentrating her efforts in several significant areas, the principal one being Public Service Renewal.

Margaret Bloodworth is playing a strong leadership role in this area. She chairs the Deputy Minister Public Service Renewal Committee, which includes members from the lead organizations responsible for human resources management. Her outreach efforts, critical to the success of renewal, have been tireless.

In October 2006, Margaret Bloodworth was appointed as the Prime Minister’s National Security Advisor.

Margaret Bloodworth’s leadership in renewal, along with the contributions of many others, will have a profound impact on the Public Service of the future, as well as on the exercise of public administration in this country.

Bloodworth’s career has seen her advance from a compensation officer prior to receiving her law degree, to holding the second most powerful position in the Public Service. She is adept at accepting new challenges, consolidating her knowledge and capabilities, and then once again rising to another position of increased responsibility.

Press Release - Winnipeg, August 28, 2007
Joseph Galimberti Receives Highest Honour Posthumously From Institute of Public Administration of Canada

Joseph (Joe) Galimberti, who devoted his life to the principles of excellence in public service and whose influence enhanced the theory and practice of public administration on four continents, has received posthumously the Vanier Medal from the Institute of Public Administration of Canada (IPAC).

“Joe was a unifying and inspirational force in public administration for more than three decades,” IPAC President Carol Layton, deputy minister of public infrastructure renewal with the Government of Ontario, said in presenting the award to Galimberti’s wife Carol at the institute’s Annual Conference.

Galimberti, who died suddenly in Toronto in April 2006 at the age of 65, was instrumental in creating numerous innovations and organizations in the public service, fostering collaboration among English- and French-speaking public servants and raising Canada to a world leadership position in improving public-sector standards and practices. His nomination for the Vanier Medal was supported by colleagues from across Canada who praised him as a leader, visionary, mentor and friend.

The Vanier Medal is one of the highest forms of recognition for Canadian public administrators. It was created in 1962 in honour of Canada’s second Canadian Governor General, the Right Honourable Georges-P. Vanier, and is awarded annually by IPAC to recognize distinctive leadership and accomplishment.

As the executive director of IPAC from 1975 to 2006, Galimberti developed an international consulting program in governance and public-sector reform using a practitioner-to-practitioner methodology. He established IPAC as a leading executing agency for the Canadian International Development Agency and the World Bank in helping to improve government capacities in more than 20 countries in Asia, Africa, the Caribbean and Eastern Europe.

The African Association for Public Administration and Management dedicated the January 2007 issue of its learned journal to Galimberti, recognizing his contribution to promoting excellence in public administration and forging relationships and partnerships between Canadian and African organizations.

The international consulting program built by Galimberti also transformed IPAC into an entrepreneurial and thriving organization managing $40 million worth of international multi-year contracts.

Galimberti began his career in 1965, after obtaining an MA in economics from the University of Toronto, as research director for what is now the Ontario Public Service Employees Union. He joined IPAC in 1968 as executive secretary, later becoming director of research and then executive director in 1975. During the next 31 years he built the organization into a uniquely successful research, publishing and conference centre for public administrators from across Canada and the world.

Among many initiatives, Galimberti:
•     Spearheaded the founding of the Commonwealth Association for Public Administration and Management and encouraged the founding of the Institute for Citizen Centred Service and the Canadian Association of Programs in Public Administration;
•     Created, designed and developed the IPAC Award for Innovative Management, the first public-sector award for innovation, which has been used as an international model;
•     Developed innovative research techniques by pioneering the collaboration of public administrators and academics in study teams and roundtables;
•     Created, designed and edited a quarterly magazine, Public Sector Management/Management et Secteur Public, developed new publication programs on public policy and management and presented numerous papers at international conferences on public-sector innovation;
•     Fostered new ways of doing business by developing extensive partnerships with governments, non-profit organizations and the private sector to deliver research and publication programs, conferences and seminars.

A constant theme in Galimberti’s career was building bridges among many groups of people. Lynne Pearson, dean emerita of the College of Commerce of the University of Saskatchewan, said in her letter supporting the Vanier Medal nomination that Galimberti played an important role in Canadian unity.

“He demonstrated the importance of intergovernmental relations at times when there were constitutional strains in the country,” Pearson said. “He worked with an executive committee, who were primarily anglophone, to help us understand and support the strong bilingual nature of IPAC programs and research.”

Don Stevenson, a past IPAC national president and retired deputy minister of intergovernmental affairs with the Government of Ontario, agreed in his letter that Galimberti was a personal force in bridging linguistic and regional divides in Canada.

“At times when governments, politicians, and even senior civil servants were at loggerheads over fiscal or jurisdictional issues, Joe was a person to whom many decision-makers turned for advice in confidence on how to deal informally with issues that had been unresolved in the formal negotiating process,” Stevenson said. “Through the trust and friendship he inspired, and his judicious capacity to bring the right people together at the right time, he contributed immensely to broadening the outlook of those who met him and nudging them toward constructive solutions to their problems.”

Luc Bernier, a professor at École nationale d'administration publique and immediate past national president of IPAC, said in tribute to Galimberti: “Joe dedicated his life to the ideals of a professional, efficient and non-partisan public service and to the cause of sustaining scholarship in this vitally important field of endeavour. His values became our values.”

Press Release - Charlottetown, August 28, 2006
Ralph Heintzman receives the 2006 Vanier Medal

Ralph Heintzman’s name in the Canadian public service has become synonymous with the highest standards of ethics, accountability and service delivery. Now he is being honoured with the Vanier Medal of the Institute of Public Administration of Canada (IPAC).

IPAC President Luc Bernier announced the selection of Heintzman for the award at the institute’s Annual Conference. The Vanier Medal is a mark of distinction and exceptional achievement, one of the highest forms of recognition for Canadian public administrators.

Heintzman, who retired in February as Vice-President (Public Service Values and Ethics) of the Public Service Human Resources Management Agency of Canada after a 30-year career in government and academia, is credited with helping to move Canada into a position of world leadership in government service delivery.

“Doctor Heintzman embodies the finest professional values in Canadian public service,” said Bernier, who is director of administration and research at École nationale d'administration publique in Montréal and is completing a one-year term as volunteer president of IPAC.

“He is a transformational leader of public organizations, and his devotion to public service is matched by his enormous devotion to people.”

Heintzman led the creation of several public-sector organizations and many influential policies and programs. He was instrumental in establishing the Citizen-Centred Service Network, the Public Sector Service Delivery Council and the Institute for Citizen-Centred Service. Those organizations have undertaken research and collaborative service-delivery projects that have resulted in Canada’s recognition, in a report by Accenture in 2005, as the leading nation in the world in public-sector service delivery.

While serving as assistant secretary, service and innovation, with Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, Heintzman created the concept of Service Canada in 1998, then oversaw its design and implementation. He led the introduction by the Government of Canada of the Service Improvement Policy (2000), under which Canada became the first country in the world to achieve a significant and measured improvement in citizen satisfaction with government service.

His peers refer to Heintzman as one of the most creative and rigorous thinkers and writers in government. A historian and expert on the Canadian constitution, he was involved during his career with many important constitutional issues. He advised Prime Minister Trudeau and the cabinet on the Meech Lake Accord and on the patriation of the Canadian constitution, and advised Prime Minister Mulroney on federal-provincial relations.

Heintzman’s contributions to public policy include the design of federal whistle-blowing protection legislation, design of the Canadian Centre for Management Development, creation of the Code of Public Service Values and Ethics and design of Treasury Board Secretariat’s strategic planning process.

Heintzman was an early and influential champion of the need for governments to work across departments and jurisdictions to achieve the public good. He is held in such high esteem that the Public Sector Service Delivery Council, the Public Sector CIO Council and the Institute for Citizen-Centred Service created the Heintzman Leadership Award in his honour in 2003. It is among the highest-prestige awards in the public sector.

Many colleagues have been inspired by Heintzman as a mentor, teacher and writer. He is the author of numerous publications in public administration, notably A Strong Foundation (1996), the report of the Deputy Minister Task Force on Public Service Values and Ethics. Written while Heintzman was vice-principal of research at the Canadian Centre for Management Development, this report is referred to by Ken Kernaghan, professor of political science and management at Brock University, as “the single most powerful statement on what the public service is all about that we have in Canadian history.”

Born in 1944, Heintzman received a B.A. and M.A. in history from the University of Toronto, then a Ph.D. in Canadian history from York University in 1977. He taught at Trent University and the University of Ottawa before joining the federal government in 1978 as a senior researcher with the Task Force on Canadian Unity. Today he remains a Fellow at the University of Ottawa.

Press Release - Regina, August 30, 2005
Distinguished Scholar Peter Aucoin Receives Top Public-Service Award

Peter Aucoin, a distinguished university professor whose teachings and research have helped shape government policies and inspire civil servants, has been accorded one of the highest honours in the Canadian public service.

Aucoin received the 2005 Vanier Medal today from the Institute of Public Administration of Canada (IPAC). Luc Bernier, President of IPAC and Director of Research and Education and Professor at the Ecole nationale d’administration publique, presented the award during IPAC’s annual conference.

“Peter Aucoin is an outstanding teacher and one of Canada’s most respected political scientists,” Bernier said. “His publications are regarded as authoritative texts on public administration, both in this country and around the world.”

A native of Halifax, Aucoin, 62, has taught in the Department of Political Science at Daihousie University since 1970. He has been chair of that department and director of the school of public administration, and is today the Eric Dennis Memorial Professor of Government and Political Science/Professor of Public Administration at Dalhousie.

Aucoin is recognized both nationally and internationally as a leading theorist on the practice and reform of the public service, including the governance of the federal cabinet and of political parties. He has contributed knowledge to the governments of Canada, the United Kingdom and Cuba, as well as to provinces, municipalities, agencies, committees and courts. He was a research coordinator for the Royal Commission on the Economic Union and Development Prospects for Canada (the Macdonald Commission, 1983-85) and research director for the Royal Commission on Electoral Reform and Party Financing (the Lortie Commission, 1990-92).

A devoted scholar, Aucoin is the author or co-author of more than a dozen books and monographs, 60 articles and book chapters, and 30 conference papers. He won the Charles H. Levine Memorial Book Prize in 1995 for his book The New Public Management: Canada in comparative Perspective. He won the J. E. Hodgetts Award in both 1993 and 2003 for articles published in Canadian Public Administration.

“Aucoin is an exemplary teacher, with the interests of his students at heart,” Bernier said. “He enjoys both the respect and affection of his academic colleagues. For 30 years he has helped prepare future public servants and scholars of government.”

Aucoin’s honours include his election as president of the Canadian Political Science Association in 1995-96 and his appointment as McCulloch Professor in Political Science at Dalhousie. 1993-2003. He received the Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia 1999 Medal for Excellence in Public Administration from IPAC. He also served as IPAC’s vice-president in 1989-91, and program chair of its National Conference in 2002.

Press Release - Ottawa, January 26, 2005
Guy Coulombe, Outstanding Public Servant, honoured at Rideau Hall

Guy Coulombe, a public servant who has been described as the “man of challenging missions and impossible jobs”, and who has worked for the greater good of his city, his province and his country during a 40-year career, has been awarded the highest honour in the Canadian public sector.

On behalf of Governor General Adrienne Clarkson, the Right Honourable Beverley McLachlin, Chief Justice of Canada, presented Mr. Coulombe with the Vanier Medal of the Institute of Public Administration of Canada today at a ceremony at Rideau Hall.
Throughout his illustrious career as a public administrator, Coulombe was often called upon to manage complex and difficult situations. His passion for his work and his professional expertise have led to important and enduring reform, restructuring and modernization in the public sector.

IPAC President Jocelyn Soulière noted that Guy Coulombe is one of the rare public servants to have worked for all three levels of government. “He is one of the great public servants,” she said: “A man of values and of clear priorities, a public administrator of the highest integrity. But Guy Coulombe is more than that he’s a builder, a leader, and a model for all of us.”

Guy Coulombe began his career in the Quebec Government, moved to the Government of Canada, and then returned to Quebec where he rose through the ranks to become Secretary General to the Executive Council In Quebec. He has served as Chief Executive Officer of Hydro-Quebec and as Director General of the City of Montreal.

Mr. Coulombe is the 43rd recipient of The Vanier Medal which was created in 1962 in honour of Canada’s second Canadian Governor General, the Right Honourable Georges-P. Vanier. It is awarded annually by IPAC to a distinguished public servant who has made a significant contribution to public administration in Canada.

Backgrounder
In the early 1960s, Guy Coulombe began his career with the appointment as chief land developer at the Eastern Quebec Development Bureau (EQDB). Under his management, the EQDB designed a regional development plan for Eastern Quebec. Following this approach to regional development, the Quebec government created the Quebec Planning and Development Bureau, and appointed Coulombe as manager of regional development. In that position, Coulombe put into place a series of sector specific programs whose influence is still felt today in several ministries.

In 1969 Coulombe moved to the Government of Canada, taking a position as Assistant Deputy Minister (Planning and Finance) at Supply and Services Canada. In his position, he soon distinguished himself as an expert in strategic policy planning.

In the early 1970s, at the height of the Quiet Revolution in Quebec, Guy Coulombe returned to the Government of Quebec, where he helped revolutionize its public service. From 1970 to 1978, he was consecutively Assistant Secretary and Secretary to the Treasury Board as well as Secretary General to the Executive Council. During this period, Coulombe contributed to the streamlining and planning of government business. He was behind the adoption of a strategic planning approach to the establishment of Quebec’s budget. He put in place a framework for the renewal of young professional civil servants’ career progression. This program, which aimed in particular at icreasing the number of women in public administration, still exists today.

He then turned his attention to troubled crown corporations. In 1978, at a time when La Société générale de financement (SGF) was experiencing difficult times, Coulombe took up the challenge of re-directing it. With a strong team, he restored the financial health of the public corporation. Within three years, the corporation was once again profitable.
In 1982 Quebec Prime Minister René Lévesque asked him to become CEO of Hydro-Québec at a time when the flagship crown corporation was facing important challenges. By the end of his mandate in 1988, Hydro-Québec had regained its footing.
During the next seven years, Coulombe dedicated himself to the development of Montreal. He was appointed CEO of the Société du centre des conférences internationales de Montréal where, with the support of economic development stakeholders and in cooperation with municipalities, he established a vital part of Quebec’s tourism infrastructure.

In 1996, a new significant challenge awaited him, namely the complete restructuring of the Sûreté du Québec. The organization was deeply shaken by the findings of a commission of inquiry into its actions and policy. Coulombe streamlined the organization and decentralized responsibilities, signed regional contracts, negotiated collective agreements and established regional emergency teams.

Finally, in 1999, Pierre Bourque, then mayor of Montreal, called upon Coulombe to initiate the changes required to create a new city of Montreal, to adapt the culture of municipal public administration to the new realities, and identify priorities. Guy Coulombe served as Director General of the City of Montreal until 2003.

Outside his professional duties, Coulombe led a fund-raising campaign for the University of Quebec and has actively worked on the financial restructuring of the newspaper Le Devoir.

Press Release - Ottawa, January 26, 2005
Guy Coulombe, Outstanding Public Servant, honoured at Rideau Hall

Guy Coulombe, a public servant who has been described as the “man of challenging missions and impossible jobs”, and who has worked for the greater good of his city, his province and his country during a 40-year career, has been awarded the highest honour in the Canadian public sector.

On behalf of Governor General Adrienne Clarkson, the Right Honourable Beverley McLachlin, Chief Justice of Canada, presented Mr. Coulombe with the Vanier Medal of the Institute of Public Administration of Canada today at a ceremony at Rideau Hall.

Throughout his illustrious career as a public administrator, Coulombe was often called upon to manage complex and difficult situations. His passion for his work and his professional expertise have led to important and enduring reform, restructuring and modernization in the public sector.

IPAC President Jocelyn Soulière noted that Guy Coulombe is one of the rare public servants to have worked for all three levels of government. “He is one of the great public servants,” she said: “A man of values and of clear priorities, a public administrator of the highest integrity. But Guy Coulombe is more than that¬-¬- he’s a builder, a leader, and a model for all of us.”

Guy Coulombe began his career in the Quebec Government, moved to the Government of Canada, and then returned to Quebec where he rose through the ranks to become Secretary General to the Executive Council In Quebec. He has served as Chief Executive Officer of Hydro-Quebec and as Director General of the City of Montreal (see attached backgrounder).

Mr. Coulombe is the 43rd recipient of The Vanier Medal which was created in 1962 in honour of Canada’s second Canadian Governor General, the Right Honourable Georges-P. Vanier. It is awarded annually by IPAC to a distinguished public servant who has made a significant contribution to public administration in Canada.

Backgrounder

In the early 1960s, Guy Coulombe began his career with the appointment as chief land developer at the Eastern Quebec Development Bureau (EQDB). Under his management, the EQDB designed a regional development plan for Eastern Quebec. Following this approach to regional development, the Quebec government created the Quebec Planning and Development Bureau, and appointed Coulombe as manager of regional development. In that position, Coulombe put into place a series of sector specific programs whose influence is still felt today in several ministries.

In 1969 Coulombe moved to the Government of Canada, taking a position as Assistant Deputy Minister (Planning and Finance) at Supply and Services Canada. In his position, he soon distinguished himself as an expert in strategic policy planning.

In the early 1970s, at the height of the Quiet Revolution in Quebec, Guy Coulombe returned to the Government of Quebec, where he helped revolutionize its public service. From 1970 to 1978, he was consecutively Assistant Secretary and Secretary to the Treasury Board as well as Secretary General to the Executive Council. During this period, Coulombe contributed to the streamlining and planning of government business. He was behind the adoption of a strategic planning approach to the establishment of Quebec’s budget. He put in place a framework for the renewal of young professional civil servants’ career progression. This program, which aimed in particular at icreasing the number of women in public administration, still exists today.

He then turned his attention to troubled crown corporations. In 1978, at a time when La Société générale de financement (SGF) was experiencing difficult times, Coulombe took up the challenge of re-directing it. With a strong team, he restored the financial health of the public corporation. Within three years, the corporation was once again profitable.
In 1982 Quebec Prime Minister René Lévesque asked him to become CEO of Hydro-Québec at a time when the flagship crown corporation was facing important challenges. By the end of his mandate in 1988, Hydro-Québec had regained its footing.
During the next seven years, Coulombe dedicated himself to the development of Montreal. He was appointed CEO of the Société du centre des conférences internationales de Montréal where, with the support of economic development stakeholders and in cooperation with municipalities, he established a vital part of Quebec’s tourism infrastructure.

In 1996, a new significant challenge awaited him, namely the complete restructuring of the Sûreté du Québec. The organization was deeply shaken by the findings of a commission of inquiry into its actions and policy. Coulombe streamlined the organization and decentralized responsibilities, signed regional contracts, negotiated collective agreements and established regional emergency teams.

Finally, in 1999, Pierre Bourque, then mayor of Montreal, called upon Coulombe to initiate the changes required to create a new city of Montreal, to adapt the culture of municipal public administration to the new realities, and identify priorities. Guy Coulombe served as Director General of the City of Montreal until 2003.

Outside his professional duties, Coulombe led a fund-raising campaign for the University of Quebec and has actively worked on the financial restructuring of the newspaper Le Devoir.

Press Release - Toronto, August 26, 2003
The 2003 Vanier Medal Awarded to Public-Spirited Scholar

Paul Thomas, an outstanding teacher whose academic writings and research have helped to advance Canada’s public service, has been honoured with The Vanier Medal of the Institute of Public Administration of Canada (IPAC).
Thomas, who is Duff Roblin Professor of Government in the Political Studies Department at the University of Manitoba, received the award today at IPAC’s annual conference. The Vanier Medal is a mark of distinction and exceptional achievement, one of the highest forms of recognition for Canadian public administrators.

Professor Thomas has had a 33-year career in teaching and public administration. He is widely cited for his analyses and interpretations of the activities of federal and provincial institutions. His writings have revealed how institutions operate and how participants in the public sector cope with change.

Described as a “gentleman of the old school” with a commitment to rolling up his sleeves to help with public issues, Professor Thomas has led or participated in public inquiries dealing with health care, economic growth, urban governance, electoral reform and access to information. Recommendations from these inquiries have led to changes in public services and governance. As a member of the City of Winnipeg Act Review Committee in 1984-85, he contributed to significant improvements in Winnipeg’s legislative framework.

He served in 1999-2000 as an adviser to three committees of the Office of the Auditor General of Canada on the topics of accountability to Parliament, human resource management reform in the federal public service and performance measurement and reporting in government.

In Manitoba, Professor Thomas was chair of the board of the Manitoba Telephone System in 1987-89, and contributed to its subsequent privatization. As chair of the Review and Implementation Committee for the Inquest Report on the Pediatric Surgery Deaths at the Health Sciences Centre in Winnipeg, in 2000-01, he wrote the 187-page report to the health minister on this difficult and contentious issue.

At present he is chair of the Regional Planning Advisory Committee of the Government of Manitoba, chair of the Advisory Council for the Order of Manitoba, a member of the Advisory Committee of the Chief Administrative Officer for the City of Winnipeg and a consultant to the Manitoba Aboriginal Justice Implementation Committee and the Office of the Auditor General of Canada.

Professor Thomas received a Ph.D in political economy from the University of Toronto in 1976. He received earlier degrees from the University of Manitoba, and has spent his academic career at that university. In 1999 he was appointed as the university’s first Duff Roblin Professor in Government.

As a teacher, Professor Thomas has won several awards for excellence. He has influenced countless students of public administration, many of whom now hold senior positions. He founded the Manitoba Legislative Internship Program in the 1970s, and also helped establish and manage the Joint Master’s Program in Public Administration at the University of Manitoba and the University of Winnipeg.

Professor Thomas is co-author of a widely used textbook, Introduction to Canadian Public Administration: Some Problematic Perspectives (Toronto: Prentice Hall, 1987, 2nd ed., with Professor R. Adie), along with about 50 scholarly articles or book chapters and numerous conference papers and workshop presentations.

He shaped the intellectual contours of public administration as editor for six years (1993-99) of Canadian Public Administration, the academic journal published by IPAC. He has informed the public, too, as a respected political commentator on public governance and politics on television in Manitoba.

Professor Thomas received the 1994 Lieutenant Governor’s Award for Distinguished Public Service, which is given by the Institute of Public Administration of Canada (Manitoba Chapter). In 1995 he was named a Senior Fellow of the Canadian Centre for Management Development in Ottawa.